Category Archives: Cloud Computing

Autonomous Vehicles and the Internet of Things

This is our second post in a row regarding autonomous vehicles, otherwise referred to as driverless cars.  As we noted last week, driverless cars are no longer an idea of the future or science-fiction. Very soon they will become every commuter’s reality. Several major car companies such as Ford, Volvo, and Toyota have announced that their autonomous vehicles will be available to the mass market within five years. The belief among manufacturers is that autonomous vehicles will reduce traffic congestion, create efficiency, increase safety and save consumers money (i.e. time and fuel). Simultaneously with the development of autonomous cars – …

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Autonomous Vehicle Business Models: How Will You ‘Own’ One?

Google, Uber, and several major automakers are working to bring autonomous vehicles (i.e. self-driving cars) to the marketplace. In mid-October 2016, Tesla announced that three of its models will be fitted with all the hardware needed to be driverless. In September 2016, Uber cars were seen on the streets in self-driving mode. The technology is rapidly maturing, and we continue to see testing of cars with driverless capabilities in some cities.  There has been speculation that autonomous vehicles are the next radical market transformation for the automotive industry, as cloud computing was for the software industry.  The prediction is that …

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Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) – Be Smart

At the dawn of portable electronic devices, they were primarily work-related productivity tools.  Often, employers would purchase (or lease) devices and distribute them to their need-to-have employee base.  It’s not so long ago that we can remember when the Blackberry transitioned from a business device to a consumer device.  Everybody wanted a Blackberry (weren’t those the days for RIM?) and free email providers like Yahoo and Gmail offered accessibility of their email content through the Blackberry. Then, mobile devices got smart.  They became phones and productivity tools and the footprint shrunk from two devices to one.  One smart device that …

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Outsourcing Lessons from an “Uber” Uber-Rider

In July 2015, my 12-year-old SUV, with 220,000 miles, finally breathed its last breath.  It was time for me to buy a new car.  But, instead, I decided to try a little personal experiment with the “sharing economy.”  Based on a back-of-the-napkin calculation, I determined that it might actually be cheaper to completely outsource my driving to Uber (or its competitor, Lyft).  Using a source like Edmunds.com, it’s easy to find out the “true cost of ownership” of any car you might have your eye on.  Looking at comparable replacement vehicles, my “true cost to own”– fees, fuel, insurance, maintenance …

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Re-Thinking the “Standard” Arbitration Clause in Cloud Agreements (Part III): Taking Full Advantage of ADR in Cloud Agreements

Part I of this three-part article included some history about how it came to be so common that modern technology agreements – including “cloud agreements” – often include a “standard” arbitration clause. Part II asked and answered the question: Is arbitration “cheaper, faster and better” than a traditional lawsuit? This final installment will focus on some of the clear disadvantages of arbitration and make some suggestions regarding how to better take advantage of the availability of ADR. Sometimes, It’s Not How You Play the Game, It’s Whether You Win or Lose The one aspect of arbitration that is perhaps most …

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Rethinking the “Standard” Arbitration Clause in Cloud Agreements (Part II)

Part I of this article included a little bit of history about how it came to be so common that modern technology agreements – including “cloud agreements” – often include a rather ubiquitous, sort of “standard” arbitration clause. The first article in this three-part series also put forth the question of whether some of the common assumptions about arbitration – namely, that arbitration is cheaper, faster and better than a traditional lawsuit – are true. This middle article in the series aims to try to answer that question: Is arbitration truly “cheaper, faster or better?” A close examination of these …

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Rethinking the “Standard” Arbitration Clause in Cloud Agreements

Twenty or so years ago, arbitration began to gain wide acceptance among lawyers as a viable alternative for the effective resolution of civil disputes.  Clients were beginning to view “alternative dispute resolution” (ADR) as the best hope for avoiding the expensive morass that litigation in court can sometimes be.  As a result, many trial lawyers began to jump on the bandwagon and tout their skills not only as trial lawyers, but also as experts in “all forms of dispute resolution.”  Certainly, very few lawyers ever attempted to talk their client out of inserting an arbitration clause into an agreement.  Indeed, …

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How Does Your Terms of Service Agreement Rate?

Online terms of service agreements are the rarely-read but often-mocked daily annoyance of Internet users worldwide.  A large (literally) barrier to the immediate gratification of access to online content, most of us are guilty of blindly clicking “I accept” when prompted.  We do this, often with a very limited understanding that in exchange for “businesses giv[ing us] these fantastic services, Google Search, Facebook and many other things, for free[,]” we give those businesses information they then commercialize by, for example, selling to advertisers.  Often unknown to us is exactly what information we are giving, who is seeing it, or how …

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Cloud Sharing Apps Scrutinized for ePHI

In a relatively short time period, the direct costs of document storage have dropped precipitously, and cloud-based document storage has become ubiquitous. Clearly, this is a wave of the future. But a recent settlement agreement between the Office of Civil Rights and a Boston area hospital should make it plain that, when it comes to electronic protected health information, mobile devices and cloud-based storage apps carry significant risk. On July 8, 2015, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Civil Rights and St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center entered into a settlement agreement following an investigation into a complaint …

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